Author: kilmann

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1559528242530{margin-right: 115px !important;margin-left: 115px !important;}"] Learn all about the renowned Thomas-Kilmann Instrument (TKI assessment) directly from the person who co-created it: Dr. Ralph H. Kilmann! All his scientific research, online courses, and TKI certifications are available on this website. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" thickness="15"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" padding_top="50" padding_bottom="50" z_index=""][vc_column][vc_column_text] Our TKI Options [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" thickness="15"][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="center" css_animation="" el_class="post-row-sm"][vc_column_inner el_class="col-all-courses" width="1/2"][vc_single_image image="17917" img_size="full" alignment="center" onclick="custom_link" qode_css_animation="" link="/assessments/thomas-kilmann-instrument-one-assessment-person/"][vc_separator type="transparent" thickness="5"][vc_column_text] One TKI Assessment Per Person [vc_separator type='transparent' position='center' color='' thickness='2' up='' down=''] The TKI allows you to discover whether you might be overusing or underusing one or...

by Ralph H. Kilmann and Ian I. Mitroff This article was originally published in Interfaces, Vol. 6, No. 2 (1976), pages 17-27. ABSTRACT This paper neither presents the kind of data nor the kinds of symbols that are found in the typical paper in Management Science. It deals with an important class of variables that have been slighted in the literature of OR/MS: qualitative variables. This paper presents a methodology for gathering and for analyzing a special class of qualitative variables, i.e., the projective, symbolic images that managers have of their ideal organization. More specifically, this paper shows how personality variables impact on (1) the raw images...

by Ralph H. Kilmann Appreciating and managing differences go hand-in-hand with understanding and improving many aspects of human behavior. The MBTI reveals the fundamental differences among people while the TKI provides the fundamental ways of resolving those differences. Using these two tools together, therefore, is both natural and beneficial. THE FOUR PSYCHOLOGICAL TYPES In research studies on psychological types, it is apparent that the four basic types (ST, NT, SF, and NF) bring out the key differences among worldviews, hidden assumptions, ideal organizations, notions of productivity and success, preferences for organizational structure, types of organizational structures, reactions to learning experiences, steps in problem management,...

by Ralph H. Kilmann Then and Now: What I’ve Learned In 1970, while enrolled in UCLA’s doctoral program in the behavioral sciences, I took the Myers Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI) assessment for the first time. I came out as an INFP—very slight on I, moderate on F, but very clear on N and P. Later, as a professor at the University of Pittsburgh, I published several books and articles using psychological type to classify, for example, different organizational and group structures, different criteria for measuring organizational effectiveness, and different steps for defining and solving complex problems. In 1972, Dr. Ken Thomas and I developed the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict...

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1560008500039{margin-right: 125px !important;}"]by Ralph H. Kilmann This article was originally published in G. Zaltman (Ed.), Management Principles for Nonprofit Agencies and Organizations (New York: American Management Association, 1979), pages 213-255. INTRODUCTION Managers are continually beset with problems. Some of these are very well structured, concrete, easily definable, and solvable. For example, which of three photocopiers is most economical to purchase or lease given the projected duplicating needs of the high school? Which of two candidates would best fit the job of assistant to the hospital administrator? Which of three methods of inventory control would minimize out-of-stock inconveniences...

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1560010269756{margin-right: 125px !important;}"]by Ralph H. Kilmann and Ian I. Mitroff This article was originally published in California Management Review, Vol. 21, No. 3 (Spring 1979), pages 26–33; reprinted in Gore, G. J., and R. G. Wright (Eds.), The Academic/Consultant Connection (Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall/Hunt, 1979), 71-80. INTRODUCTION Intervention theory [1] and the consulting process [2] have developed to provide more effective methods by which organizational change is conducted. These methods have emerged in order to operationalize a theory of changing rather than a theory of change. The latter is what Bennis [3] found to be the focus of most discussions on...

by Ralph H. Kilmann This article is adapted from R. H. Kilmann, Quantum Organizations: A New Paradigm for Achieving Organizational Success and Personal Meaning (Newport Coast, CA: Kilmann Diagnostics, 2011), 97–107. ABSTRACT During the past few decades, there have been extensive efforts by both academics and practitioners to identify and manage an organization’s culture. Regrettably, however, the term “culture” is often spoken without clarifying its meaning or making it operational for use. Not surprisingly, therefore, efforts to improve corporate performance by changing corporate culture have been severely limited—and largely disappointing. To rectify the current situation, this paper revisits a fundamental aspect of culture, behavioral norms, and shows...

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1560012032973{margin-right: 125px !important;}"]by Ralph H. Kilmann This article is adapted from R. H. Kilmann, Quantum Organizations: A New Paradigm for Achieving Organizational Success and Personal Meaning (Newport Coast, CA: Kilmann Diagnostics, 2011), 121–135. Assumptional analysis is a systematic method for tackling the most complex steps of problem management: defining problems and implementing solutions. This method not only pinpoints all the decision trees that are potentially relevant to problem definitions and implementation plans; it also probes below the surface of each tree to reveal its roots—the implicit assumptions that keep each tree alive and well. It is through the use...

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1560011723955{margin-right: 125px !important;}"]by Ralph H. Kilmann This article was originally published in Human Systems Management, Vol. 3, No. 2 (1982), pages 66-76. ABSTRACT A number of different design alternatives are distinguished according to whether each is best for addressing a well-defined or an ill-defined problem. The latter is reserved for a collateral design, one that coexists with the formal, operational design but is structured as a flexible, open, loose, “organic-adaptive” system of problem-solving groups. A number of key steps are presented for designing such a collateral organization so that the operational design and the collateral design will...

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1560012663484{margin-right: 125px !important;}"]by Ralph H. Kilmann An earlier version of this article was published in Accounting, Organizations and Society, Vol. 8, No. 4, 1983, pages 347-357. ABSTRACT For theoretical and methodological convenience, accountants often assume that the divisions of an organization are largely independent of one another and that divisional managers therefore can make decisions consistent with global optimality. Along with these assumptions, accountants have taken the structure of an organization as fixed and not changeable. This paper suggests a framework and method for assessing the costs resulting from non-independent divisions, as a component of organization productivity....